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position against assad and calling for him to leave and accusing him of terrible deeds. so, yes, but it's not in the interest of the syrians to provoke the turks. the turkish army is fairly strong and the syrians are already having trouble fighting the free syrian army why bring in another enemy? >> pelley: hisham melhem, you see it that way to? >> the syrians said they are investigating the accident but obviously we don't know if t exact circumstances. logically one would say assad can't provoke the turks because the turkish army is strong and they can take out the syrian army which is already exhausted. at the same time there are those who would argue that it's in the interest of syria to force the turks to play their hand and even the threat of a regional conflagration could force the international powers, the russians, the iranians, others to push the turks not to help the syrian opposition as we talk now we can talk about a regional conflict albeit on a limited basis. we know iranians are sending technicians, trainers -- >> warner: you say it's already starting. >> of course, and w
the hole in the middle of this is what is a post as sad, assad syria going to look at, what is the political and security order of a post assad era on? >> you has mosni on the panel you need to get egypt, iran and others aund the tab. >> it seems me he is right, basically, because all of those four countries have got a buying interest and we have interests as well, so i think we -- >> you don't mind the idea of iran being part of that and saudi arabia? >> they already are a part of it. >> they have dealt themselves in but in a negative way. >> but the united states has not bought into that idea. >> it is very difficult and if you are saying to me what is going to be the thing that in the end find a way through, i haven't yet seen a military plan that has said to me, yes this is a way of protectin ose people. and -- but the threat from the minister in my time said the definition of foreign policy is stopping people from killing each other and i am not seeing governance or intelligence i have not seen an intervention plan that could in the least bit work. >> i am not arguing e
to president bashar al assad. the free syrian army renewed its offensive last week in an effort to win control of aleppo. government forces responded with air strikes. a free syrian army said they mobilized 30,000 troops and 2,000 tanks for the battle. rebel fighters plan to carry out more simultaneous bombing attacks on the military. >>> plummeting value of iran's currency has triggered rare street clashes in the capital tehran. the protests jai alai growing public frustration with the government. scores of protesters clashed with riot police in the city's main bazaar on wednesday. they demanded the government stop the rial's plunge. it lost 70% of the value in the last year since economic sanctions were imposed by the united states and europe over iran's nuclear program. it's dipped to record lows against the dollar. a money exchanger who witnessed the protest told nhk by phone that the demonstrators were merchants. >> there are no reports yet of injuries. many shops have closed in and around the bazaar. security officers are patrolling the area. anti-government protests are unusual in iran.
border attacks. the remark by anders is seen as a warning to bashar al-assad to immediately halt the mortar attacks. >> obviously turkey has a right to defend herself. we have all necessary plans in place to protect and defend turkey. >> rasmussen said that a political solution is the best way to stop the conflict in syria. he called on turkey to show restraint. nato views an attack against a member country as an attack on the alliance as a whole. its members can jointly defend the country. until now nato leaders have repeatedly denied the possibility of military intervention in syria. they have said it could destabilize the rejn. region. >>> the international energy agency predicts iraq's oil production will more than double by 2020 from the current level. the iea made a forecast in a report released on tuesday. the report says that iraq will likely produce 6.1 million barrels of oil a day by 2020. iraq has signed many contracts with international oil companies. the country has been making progress and reconstruction since the u.s. led war. the iea also projects by 2035 iraq's d
to remove syria's president, bashar al-assad, by being an ally to the regime at the united nations and providing vital fuel to power assad's crackdown. indeed, as an aging fidel castro of cuba fades from visibility, chavez has supplanted him as the united states' nearest foe. and on the other side, running against chavez is david. for the first time, the typically fractured opposition has united around a challenger, henrique capriles radonski, a telegenic former governor of the populous state of miramba 18 years chavez's junior. >> ( translated ): and i say to the people of venezuela, you judge who is in the process of change and who has become sick from power, because he who is now in the palace has defrauded the venezuelan people. >> suarez: often clad in a baseball cap bearing venezuela's national colors, the redbull- drinking 40-year-old markets himself as a modern leftist, someone who can balance free market incentives with the country's social wfare programs, like brazil. and he's struck a chord. in february's primary, he took 64% of the more than three million votes cast amo
, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some consequences. it's not for me to elaborate on which consequences. but i do believe that the whole international community has a responbility to prevent what i see as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an a
overwhelmingly powerful egyptian pharaoh named anwar sadat. in syria he dealt with hafez assad and in israel he dealt with golda meyer who has such a majority in the israeli parliament no one had ever heard of the likud my noorty policy. so kissinger had to deliver three people. flash forward, you're hillary clintonow. you ha to negotiate with a muslim brotherhood president of egypt who is in a -- just new to the job in a very frail and weak situation. you've got a revolution in syria, there's basically no one to deal with. you could deal with haefz but he can't deliver six blocks beyond his palace and in israel you have a minority government led baby by netanyahu that is an extreme government. it's michele bachmann 20 times over. so it's not exactly an environment conducive for great heroic foreign policy. mam tell your dughters not to grow up to secretaries of state, not now. you want to be secretary of education, not secretary of state. >> rose: (laughs) so what ought to be the foreign policy debate in this campaign? >> well, i tell you what i've been focused on and i think it's about making
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)